Tervuren mayor talks traffic jams

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Updated with comments below from tram company Mivb.

Tervuren’s mayor Marc Charlier is hoping for traffic to run smoother on the Tervurenlaan after meeting contractors and the public company responsible for Brussels’ trams — the Mivb.

Charlier told Facebook followers that the Tervurenlaan will now be closed off for a shorter section around the current work zone. And traffic along the Albertlaan, connecting the HHC school with the Tervurenlaan, is only going to be interrupted from 9:30 am to 3 pm.

Town hall admitted closure of the Albertlaan had caused traffic jams earlier in the week on both Tervurenlaan and in surrounding areas. But the town now also points to changed signaling on Tervurenlaan between Oppemstraat and Brusselsesteenweg.

“Further follow-up and evaluation of the results of these measures is planned. Hopefully, traffic on Tervurenlaan will run smoother again,” Flemish nationalist NV-A Charlier told his 1000 Facebook followers.

Town hall admitted closure of the Albertlaan had caused traffic jams earlier in the week on both Tervurenlaan and in surrounding areas. But the town now also points to changed signaling on Tervurenlaan between Oppemstraat and Brusselsesteenweg.

Still confused?

Works for tram 44 are due to continue till ‘around’ June 2025, a spokeswoman for Mivb told Tervuren+. From Monday 8 April till 31 May, trams will even run normally along the entire 44 route.

“The line will be cut again from the beginning of June 2024 until around June 2025 for the continuation of the work on the Woluwe side,” added the spokeswoman.

That effectively means from 1 June till 31 August, Mivb should provide a regular bus service between the Tram Museum and Madoux stations on the Brussels’ part of the Tervurenlaan.

But from September 2024, line 44 will be restricted to Drie Kleuren with a shuttle bus continuing on to Tervuren Station. In the direction towards the city, the shuttle will connect with trams 39 and 44 at Madoux station.

Still confused? Read the signs if your Dutch and French are up to it. Alternatively, ask those fellow passengers who look less confused.